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Norwegian (and Danish) Bible translations

2011: The new Bible translation in bokmål and nynorsk has been published on 19. October. The Old Testament translation was started in 2004. The new translation will be launched both in book and electronic formats.


2005: New Testament in a new translation in bokmål and nynorsk, started in 2000. A more concordant translation than the previous from 1978/85.


2005: New Living Bible (NT) produced by IBS. The translation is more paraphrase.


1997: Bibelen Guds Ord. This is a Norwegian ”New King James Bible”, translated from other Greek NT manuscripts than the other Norwegian bibles. Published by Bibelforlaget/Hermon Publishing Company.


1988: Bibelen – Den Hellige Skrift. A more concordant translation. Publishing by Norsk Bibel.


1985: A modest revision of the 1978-translation.Up till now this (NO78/85) is the most common Bible translation in Norway.


1978: A new translation into both bokmål and nynorsk from Hebrew and Greek. The translation took 20 years to complete, and was the first translation into both languages at the same time. It was an idiomatic translation based on the principle of dynamic equivalence.


1975: Godt Nytt (Good News). A new NT translation in bokmål and nynorsk with the Vallaton drawings.


1969: Erik Gunnes’ NT-translation. This was a private Catholic translation and has been extensively used in The Catholic church, also as a liturgical text.


1961: A special Youth NT in nynorsk


1959: A special Youth NT in bokmål


1938: Revision of the 1921-Bibelen in nynorsk. First Bible Society production of nynorsk Bible.


1930: Revision of the 1904-Bibelen in bokmål


1921: First complete Bible translation in nynorsk published by Studentmållaget (Student Language Association). The work started in the 1880’ies.


1904: NT in riksmål (bokmål). This completed the first ever translation of the full Bible into Norwegian language directly from the Hebrew and Greek texts. This was a concordant, word by word translation..


1899: NT in landsmål (nynorsk). This was a revised edition of the 1889-translation, but with Bible Society as publisher..


1891: First Norwegian direct translation of the Old Testament from Hebrew. The translation work took nearly 50 years.


1889: NT in landsmål (nynorsk). This was the first Norwegian edition of the NT directly translated from Greek. Published by Det Norske Samlaget.


1854: The first Bible produced by The Norwegian Bible Society. The OT was a revised version of the Resen-Svaning Bible (1647), while the NT followed an edition from 1830. This Bible was translated from Danish and not from Hebrew and Greek..


1820: The first NT produced by The Norwegian Bible Society. It was a revision of the Resen-Svaning Bible from 1740.


1816: The foundation of The Norwegian Bible Society. From 1819 The Norwegian Bible Society started publishing Bibles and New Testaments. During the first years these were imported from Denmark. At the same time British and Foreign Bible Society (BFBS) also published Bibles in Norwegian. They had the bulk of Bible distribution in Norway in the 19th century.


1670: Fredrik 3’s House- and Travel Bible. This built on the translation from Luther.


1647: The Resen-Svaning Bible (RS). Professor Hans Svane revised the Bible translated by Resen in 1607. This Bible was strongly influenced by Hebrew and Greek sentence structure and was therefore difficult to understand for common people in Denmark/Norway.


1633: Christian 4’s Bible. The king was unhappy with the translation done by Resen and a new revision of the 1589-edition was made.


1607: The Resen Bible. Many wanted a translation closely built on the base texts in Hebrew and Greek. Professor Hans Resen was asked to revise the1589 translation, but in stead he made a completely new translation. This translation follows the original Bible languages word by word and is therefore difficult to understand.


1589: Fredrik 2’s Bible. This was a revision of the1550-translation. Many of the old church Bibles still left in Norway are from 1589.


1550: Christian 3’s Bible, also called the Reformation Bible. This edition was printed in 3 000 copies, and 96 came to Norway. It was based on Luther’s German translation from 1534 and used a clear and easy to understand Danish. This translation is more idiomatic than concordant.


1524: Christian 2’s New Testament